Miscellaneous

Odd blog posts that don't fit anywhere else or aren't on-going concerns.

Who missed out 'appropriate communication expertise' when contracting out a patient-facing referral system?

I have a duff shoulder which needs an ultrasound. This will identify the likely diagnosis and help my GP decide where to stab the steroid injection for best effect.

'The Bank of Cancer Research'. What's that all about?

Here’s a thing that caught my eye. The Bank of Cancer Research (BCR). It looks most strange. They want to buy a bank, courtesy of the billionaire philanthropists of The Giving Pledge. I’m not sure where BCR is based – it has no obvious physical address -  but it tweets from Melbourne in Australia. It doesn’t have any country specific vibe, which is why I looked for a clue to its place.

Are health charities ethical? How do we tell?

To avoid huff, puff and ruffled feathers, I don’t mean that health charities are unethical; I’m simply asking how we know health charities are ethical. I’ve been wondering since seeing the Pancreatic Cancer Action advert in February. I was struck by the range of ethical ‘I wonder if’s?’ and 'did they do's?' I could list after seeing it.

Beating cancer 100 years ago - strangely familiar stuff.

Apparently ‘the sooner you support us, the sooner we’ll beat cancer’. I saw that recently on a Cancer Research UK fundraising poster at a bus stop in Turnham Green. And, in other fundraising which fell out of my Sunday paper, Cancer Research UK have been working tirelessly towards beating cancer ‘for over 100 years’. These are interesting contrasts. 'Sooner' and '100 years'.

So, naturally, I turn to 1907 and The Saturday Review of 6 July pages 6-7 to check “The Fight With Cancer”.

A woman wonders aloud about Movember.

I’m more MoMotha or MoGran than MoSista these days but I’m legit. as a target for Movember fundraising asks – so I do have a stake in what Movember are up to and I pay attention. Now I’ve stopped taking any notice of its own estimation of its good effects, other reservations have also begun to emerge.

Their tone.

How many people does it take to book an appointment?

A codicil to the previous post.

I have been wondering, vaguely, when an appointment for a brain scan would come through and if I should ring up about it. I was to be sent for one, as this was the outcome of the appointment which needed seventeen pages of information to prepare me for it, last time (see prev. post). I was both discharged from the hospital AND and booked for the brain scan at the same time. Odd, I agree, but it makes sense to me, so don't dwell on that. I am making a different point. 

Next time just send the flaming out-patient appointment.

Here’s a mad thing.

I am an Ealing resident. I needed a simple out-patient appointment at Charing Cross Hospital. I was sent one. I had to make one change, by moving the appointment to a new time the next day. I did so.

Insurance, women, cancer and risk. Barclays sells us their solution!

Today’s the day I rush up to Barclays and jab my mighty right forefinger in their corporate rib cage and bellow “Oi! Barclays! No! What are you thinking?”

Apart from ‘ooo….. money’ and ‘cooo….. profit’ that is?

Pollin’ pollin’ pollin’ ....Keep them pollsters pollin’ 1

CR-UK has released some non-riot news into August – some polling yet again, on  the unfortunate British and their ‘fear of cancer’. I’ve been here twice before, just like CR-UK, in a couple of posts from 2010.  

Breast screening and the individual: there’s no such thing as a purely personal decision.

Goodness knows if anyone has researched the anthropology or sociology of British women’s engagement with breast screening. I don’t feel inclined to search literature today to find out if they have, so I’ll stick with pondering, for now.